WRITE AS WE SPEAK FOR SEO SUCCESS

WRITE AS WE SPEAK FOR SEO SUCCESS

If you are in marketing or journalism, one of the most important lessons you learn at the outset is to write as you speak. As you would to a friend in the pub. Only the social setting is now very different.

Deploying excellent Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) techniques is an essential part of building and maintaining a website, to ensure that you are found when people search for you or someone with your skillset on the internet.

This has been the case for many years now, but technological advances have necessitated that optimising voice content for SEO is now a must too – and it’s different from traditional SEO.

With sales of smart speakers globally now in the billions, more people are choosing voice searches – and SEO specialists need to tailor their keywords to what people are audibly requesting.
Targeting voice search can also help your site’s overall SEO and ranking and search engines and when websites optimise for voice searches, this potentially gives your site greater authority and higher positions on results pages.
As marketers we have to know how voice search is different from text search even though there is an overlap between on-page search optimisation and voice search optimisation.
Voice searches generally reflect how we speak when in conversation with a friend, when you might ask, “what is the best Indian restaurant in Inverness?” In a text search, you are more likely to type in “top Indian restaurant near me”. The change is subtle, but significant.
Search engines are now picking up intent behind the query rather than just the keywords in the query itself.
To optimise for voice search, an essential thing to do is target long-tail keywords, especially question keywords, in your content. In this way you’ll capture traffic from users who submit lengthier, more specific queries.
Long-tail keywords contain three or more words and are a major component of keyword optimisation in general. They attract high-intent traffic because they’re more specific to the user’s intent. You can also make them more specific to your business (e.g., “car dealers in Inverness and throughout the Highlands area” instead of just “car dealers”), which means less competition on the results page.
To find question keywords, we have to think of “who,” “what,” “when,” “where,” and “how” questions that users are most interested in.
And we have to think of how people speak and what they are likely to say when framing our content. It allows for a more casual writing style, but importantly Google still values this kind of high-quality content – we have to just write it as if we were saying it out loud.
It’s the same age-old message for bang-up-to-date times: be mindful when it comes to your words.